A Note from Mel

Make the connection…

TIDE’S IN! – Tidal Basin Review, Winter 2015 Issue! January 29, 2015

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The Tidal Basin Review Launches the 2084 Issue!

The complete E-Issue of the Tidal Basin Review is available at www.TidalBasinPress.org.

THE WRITING LESSON

Cover Art by Allen Forrest

January 27, 2015 – Washington, DC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Tidal Basin Press, Inc. launches the WINTER 2015 Issue (The2084 Issue) of the Tidal Basin Review.

Tidal Basin Review is an electronic literary journal with a print-on-demand option. Tidal Basin Press, Inc. seeks to amplify the voice of the human experience through art that is intimate, engaging, and audacious. We make every effort to include work that propels the present artistic landscape and to publish the wide spectrum of American voices.

The 2084/Winter 2015 Issue features visual artist, Allen Forrest, a special essay from Henry Giroux, interviews with poets, Derrick Weston Brown and Alan King, and the creative works of 23 writers imaging our world 100 years after 1984, the prophetic novel by George Orwell.

View the full E-Issue and order your print copy of the 2084 Issue of Tidal Basin Review atwww.TidalBasinPress.org.

Winter 2015 Contributors: Liz Ahl, Joshua Bennett, Derrick Weston Brown, Joan Colby, Curtis Crisler, Carol Dorf, Milton Ehrlich, Allen Forrest, Henry A. Giroux, Claire Hermann, Jen Karetnick, Alan King, JW Mark, Britt Melewski, Jonathan Moody, Keith Moul, Barry W. North, Randy Parker, Adrienne Perry, Ken Poyner, henry 7. reneau, jr., Joseph Ross, Penelope Scambly Schott, and Scott T. Starbuck.

Press Contact:

Melanie Henderson, Managing Editor

tidalbasinpress@gmail.com

 

“Wish You Were Here” November 2, 2012

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It’s been just over a week. I have felt every second, yet recall most of it as a blur. I feel something other than sad—  Devastated? No, not quite. I don’t think there is a word for losing a friend in body and knowing this is how it will be for the rest of your waking days. As Marlene would say, I have “ugly cried,” I have wept, I have been silent, I have been brave, weak, tired, restless, terrified, peaceful, and tearful all over again.

In recent years, I was lucky if I saw Marlene more than once a year (and some years, I was that lucky 😉 But, we witnessed each other nearly everyday, sometimes via phone calls late at night. She’d be up working tirelessly touching and retouching photos for a client. Those phone calls only ended as one of us would start to make less and less sense because the morning was upon us; via gchats randomly throughout the day, some that made us guffaw and snortle with laughter. My goodness how we laughed until I had to beg her to cut it out because my cheeks hurt. Apparently, she was the remedy for my out-of-shape laughter muscles.

Our exchanges became integral to my daily life. We challenged each other. Walked each other through trials with tough love and that truth we sometimes didn’t want to hear. No matter the content of our conversations, we always knew every word was composing something much more eternal than mere chatter. We had been building sisterhood, constantly reminding each other of the magic and powers of such a thing. She taught me so much about friendship—things I thought I knew, but hadn’t quite mastered and still haven’t. We were constantly growing each other up and making the other a little less silly. But man, we were so silly after we got through the tough stuff, whatever that may have been at the time.

Tomorrow, I and the masses of people she touched with her big heart, quick wit, and breadth of talents will say ‘goodbye’ to her. I just cannot think of how I can. I know she will never call me again. Her name will never pop up on my g-chat screen. She will never post “I love you, Sis” followed by a slew of hearts on my FB page. She will never drop into town and opt for the couch, a glass of Malibu and pineapple, and endless talk. I know this, yet I still just cannot imagine it.

She posted the following picture on my page this year with the caption “Wish you were here.”

“Wish you were here” by Marlene Lillian Hawthrone

Tonight, she just doesn’t know what I would give to hear her laugh again.

There is just something special about the family we choose.

I miss you, Sis, and will love you always ❤

 

The Sister I Chose. October 27, 2012

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Marlene Hawthrone (November 26, 1982 – October 24, 2012)

I am waiting for the phone to ring,

to hear Nina sing about birds flying high,

a sun up in the sky. I am waiting

to hear the rapid fire of your day,

what dawning of love lit in brightly

colored wedding gowns and matching

suits got snagged in the teeth of your lens.

 

I am waiting to hear how you touched

and retouched a new human who had

no warning of your impossible wit, or spirit,

waiting for you to carve out a second

of your day and hand it to me within

the vast limits of four sealed lines.

 

I am waiting to swap secrets of great shame,

sass and delight, secrets so big, only hearts

as big as ours could promise to bury them

with our skins singed in the fire of growing older,

and a little less silly.

 

I am waiting to claim again with you some

greatness, to lift each other out of failure & defeat

with many hard, long sermons delivered

from the valley of sisterhood, I am waiting

to hear ‘I love you. Goodnight.’

 

I am waiting to meet your curly-haired

offspring years from now while you dote

on my little one’s zest as if Rumi is pulling

back your ‘fro and whispering in your ear.

 

I am waiting for you to live for you, to leave

behind anything and everyone who thinks

they can hold or direct the secret light in your eyes.

I beg they let you see less of them and more of you.

 

I am waiting for you to show up and disappear,

promise and change your mind; You have become

a firefly, and I, a wistful child waiting for your

promised and indeterminable green glow.

 

The Tidal Basin Review Launches Summer 2010 Issue! August 2, 2010

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Cover Art, Rachel Eliza Griffiths

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The Tidal Basin Review Launches Summer 2010 Issue!

The complete sophomore issue of the Tidal Basin Review is available at www.TidalBasinPress.org.

August 2, 2010 – Washington, DC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Tidal Basin Press, LLC launches the SUMMER 2010 issue of the Tidal Basin Review.

The Tidal Basin Review is an electronic literary journal with a print-on-demand option. Tidal Basin Press, Inc. seeks to amplify the voice of the human experience through art that is intimate, engaging, and audacious. We make every effort to include work that propels the present artistic landscape and to publish the wide spectrum of American voices. The sophomore issue includes 1 featured photographer, Rachel Eliza Griffiths, and the creative works of 31 writers, including Kim Coleman Foote and Reginald Flood, the winners of the 2010 Tidal Basin Review Editorial Prize. This issue also includes responses from poets and scholars alike to Arizona’s controversial law, SB 1070.

View the Summer 2010 Issue of the Tidal Basin Review at www.TidalBasinPress.org.

Press Contacts:

Melanie Henderson, Managing Editor

Randall Horton, Editor-in-Chief

tidalbasinpress@gmail.com

 

Announcing the 2010 Tidal Basin Review Editorial Prize Call May 18, 2010

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Announcing the 2010 Tidal Basin Review Editorial Prize Call

The Tidal Basin Review invites prose and poetry submissions for the first annual Editorial Prize. One poem and one prose piece (fiction or creative nonfiction) will be chosen for this prize.

The 2010 Tidal Basin Review Editorial Prize includes:

– $200.00 for each winner;

– a framed Tidal Basin Review Editorial Prize Certificate;

– publication in the Summer Issue of the Tidal Basin Review;

– a feature reading in Washington, DC; and

– an interview on 89.3 WPFW’s, The Poet’s Corner.

TO ENTER

To submit, purchase the $15 entry fee through PayPal. Attach your manuscript in an email to tbrprize@gmail.com. In the subject line of the email, include your name and genre (i.e., Bonita Applebum / Prose Submission). Please do not introduce yourself (i.e., previous publications, place of employment, family members, or organizational affiliations) in the body of the email or anywhere else in your manuscript. Your email will be handled anonymously by someone outside of the Tidal Basin Review Editorial Review Team. Your submission will be forwarded to the review team only after all identifying markers have been removed. All contest entries will be considered for publication in the summer issue of the Tidal Basin Review.

ENTRY GUIDELINES

Writers may submit up to 5 poems (not to exceed 8 pages in total) or up to 15 double-spaced pages of prose per entry. Previously published work, including work that has appeared online (in any form), will not be considered. Multiple entries are accepted, however, each entry must be accompanied by the appropriate the entry fee. There are no restrictions regarding form, style, or content. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable under the condition that you notify us if your manuscript is accepted elsewhere. No refunds will be provided.

SUBMISSION PERIOD

Submissions will be accepted by email only at tbrprize@gmail.com from May 1, 2010 through June 30, 2010, 11:59 p.m. Any submissions received outside of this submission period will neither be considered for the contest issue nor for general publication in the Tidal Basin Review. The winners will be announced by Thursday, July 15, 2010.

NOTE: In accord with Tidal Basin Review’s mission and vision, submissions from non-US residents and/or citizens are not eligible and will not be considered for the TBR Editorial Prize.

 

Salim April 11, 2010

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My friend, our friend, Moriba Salim Hylton, was taken from us in the most unthinkable manner last August 30, 2009. Instead of using this space to address innercity gun violence or to revisit how our lives came to be forever changed in the matter of a senseless minute, I want to remember the many great memories Salim gave us on today, his 28th birthday.

My most distinct memory of Salim was when were kids, 4th or 5th graders. We would walk down N Street NW afternoons, after school. Salim was so energetic despite the restrictive navy blue pants and white uniform shirt the boys wore for school at Immaculate Conception Catholic School. He almost never walked in a straight line. He zigged up and down the street, all the way from 7th until we parted at the corner of 5th & N Streets, he, on his way to his home on M Street and me, continuing down down  N Street to my home as well. Occassionally, we’d stop at the corner store for snacks.

What I remember most is his smile.

He was one heck of an artist from very early on, showing off his spray-painted shirts whenever I, Sevontae, Thomas, and sometimes, my cousin Dusty,  detoured from the straight path home and hung out for a minute on the porch of Salim’s house. Never a dull moment with Salim. Never.  Almost all memories I have of him cause incessant smiling or laughter. Behind the playfullness though, Salim was so full of heart and always had a strong, sharp, excellent mind.

Love, hugs, peace and prayers to the Hylton family still. It goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: We’ll never forget him.

 

Haiti, 1.12.2010 January 13, 2010

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CNN’s consolidated list of ways to support the people of Haiti.

Visit: http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/impact/